Tag: Max/MSP

SQLite database for remote radio in Max

under construction…

Max/MSP features a full implementation of SQLite using the js (javascript) object. Here we describe a database to track radio frequencies. Frequencies are stored by time, type, and mode. The frequencies can be retrieved in various ways, like with a scanner radio.

Tables can be created and maintained outside of Max using the command line (sqlite3) or database apps like SQLiteStudio.

Max patches:

(not yet available on github:

  • freqdb4.maxpat (database UI)
  • swBase3.js (SQLite code)
  • lp_radio2.maxpate (Launchpad)

DB structure:

The database is called newtestDB1

tables:

You can see the table schema in the screenshots. The tables were created using command line sqlite3 and SQLiteStudio.

freq table:

One record for each stored frequency. This table retains its state from each previous use, but new records can be added using the Max patch, or the Launchpad.

Screen Shot 2016-04-05 at 11.00.31 PM

xtime: Timestamp in UTC.

frequency: Hz.
mode:

  • usb: 0
  • lsb 1
  • cw 2
  • am 3
  • fm 4

filter: bandpass filter setting in Hz. (default is 6000)

typecodes:

0 : unknown
1 : AM/SW broadcast
2 : clock
3 : digital mode
4 : local broadcast
5 : mostly noise

zone: cq zone number

rating: 0-5 (0 = unrated)

confidence: 0-5 (0 = unknown)

tags: (general text notes)

preset table:

The preset table contains one record for each 8×8 launchpad button, for each of 3 screens.

  • screen 0: fixed presets (red) (static and persistent)
  • screen 1: time presets (green) (rebuilt with each time query)
  • screen 2: user presets (yellow) (persistent but can be modified using the Launchpad)

Data from each of theses screens is also displayed in jit.cellblock objects in the Max patch. All of the fields correspond to the fields in the freq table – except for screen, row, and col which are locators for the launchpad.

Screen Shot 2016-04-05 at 11.11.08 PM

Using the database

Launchpad presets

There are three screens of presets color coded using the Launchpad mixer button (upper right). Press it to cycle through the 3 screens.

0 fixed presets (red)

The fixed presets are static. But can be changed using SQLiteStudio. They contain commonly used radio frequencies, like the SW, Ham, and CB bands. And clock stations.

To select a preset, press its button on the Launchpad.

Currently assigned presets:

Screen Shot 2016-04-05 at 11.39.12 PM

1 Time Presets (green)

Time presets are frequencies with Timestamps that match a selected range. For example, every frequency within one hour of the current time. These can be selected with a query in the Max patch, or using default values from the Launchpad. The query will randomly match up to 64 records. If the query returns less than 64 records, you will get all matching records, but in random order.

From the Max patch:

Match hours plus/minus current time (0-12).

Type the number of hours in the number box and press the button under the delay object. This reloads the presets.

Screen Shot 2016-04-05 at 11.36.35 PM

You can view the results in the jit.cellblock:

Screen Shot 2016-04-05 at 11.39.07 PM

 

Match a specific time range:

Enter the start/end times and press the button.

Screen Shot 2016-04-05 at 11.40.51 PM

 

Selecting from launchpad

trk button: re-runs query using last set number of hours plus/minus current time. Default is one.

solo button: select one random preset using current hour range, and play it?

 

User Presets (yellow)

The user presets work like the pushbuttons on a car radio. Press to select. Hold to save the currently tuned radio frequency.

The learn button (upper left) gives feedback. If you press a pad for which no frequency has been assigned, the learn button will flash red. When you save a new preset, the learn button flashes green to indicated that the saving is done. If you press a pad for a preset that has already been saved, there will be no flash, but the radio frequency will change.

Adding new frequency records

You can add records using the Max patch or the Launchpad, or from SQLiteStudio.

Adding records from Max:

Tunning the radio fills in all of the fields except for typecode. Tune the radio. Then press one of the typecode buttons. Then press the big green button. You have added a new record.

Screen Shot 2016-04-05 at 11.55.57 PM

 

Adding records with Launchpad:

Press the Arm button (lower right) to add a record for the currently tuned frequency, using an ‘unknown typecode’

Adding records from SQLiteStudio

Just do it.

Remote radio – client

How to set up the client side of the remote radio system.

(under construction) patches have not been uploaded to github

This client works with the sever described in the previous post. We are running a MacBook Pro OSx 10.11.4. with the following:

  • logmein hamachi VPN
  • Soundjack VOIP
  • Max/MSP
  • Novation launchpad
  • DJ-Tech CDJ-101 controller

VPN

Install and set up LogMein Hamachi. It is free, for a limited number of computers.  Set up a Hamachi server on both the server and client. It should look something like this:

 

VOIP

We are using Soundjack VOIP. It is also free. Use the following parameters on the client side.

  • mic: soundflower 2ch (or something that is not currently producing input!)
  • headphone: default output (or whatever you want to listen on)

Screen Shot 2016-04-05 at 12.23.54 AM

You can ignore the rest of the settings, since we are not sending audio. Most of the configuration is done on the server side.

Max

We are using several patches, depending on which hardware controllers you are using. Make sure that the hardware controllers are connected before opening Max.

patches:
  • eagle-ui5.maxpat – User interface and main entry point for client communication and CDJ-101 abstrations

Screen Shot 2016-04-05 at 12.28.56 AM

  • freqdb4.maxpat – database handler

Screen Shot 2016-04-05 at 12.29.17 AM

  • lp_radio2.maxpat – launchpad driver

Screen Shot 2016-04-05 at 12.28.41 AM

After the max patches are loaded, you should be able to control the radio using the UI and the CDJ-101 controller. The red Mixer button in the upper right corner of the Launchpad should be lit.

Instructions:

to be continued…

Remote radio – server

How to run the server side (base station) of the remote shortwave radio system.

(Under construction) The patches have not been uploaded to github yet.

Assuming that the radio and antenna system are operating. We are using an internet connected MacBook Pro running OSx 10.9.5, with a MOTU 828 MK3 audio interface.

VPN

Install and set up LogMein Hamachi. It is free, for a limited number of computers.  Set up a Hamachi server on both the server and client. It should look something like this:

 

VOIP

We are using Soundjack VOIP. It is also free. Use the following parameters on the server side.

Local Settings:
  • mic: audio interface channel that is connected to radio audio output
  • headphone: doesn’t matter
  • volume: 0
  • audio block samples: 512
  • channels: 2
  • network packet samples 512
  • quality: high
  • userlist: manual

Screen Shot 2016-04-05 at 12.38.03 AM

User list:

UDP/IP: enter hamachi IP of client.

When Soundjack is set up on the client. Press the green start button on the right side of the user list window on the server.

If all goes well, you should hear the radio on the client. Note: The input meter under local settings should be registering audio from your radio. If not, there is a problem with the audio interface.

Max Server

The Max/MSP server exchanges CAT commands via the server serial port to the radio. The command data is exchanged with a Max patch on the client using OSC (over UDP).

Screen Shot 2016-04-05 at 12.46.02 AM

patch:

eagle-cat8.maxpat

instructions:
  • select the radio serial port from the menu (for example: usbmodem 14531)
  • initialize port settings
  • set toggle to poll the serial port

At this point you should be able to try the example commands, for instance to get the version or set frequency. If the commands are not working, it indicates a problem with the serial connection to the radio.

Next, check the IP address of the udpsend object. It should be the hamachi IP of the client.

 

Remote controlled shortwave radio system

Under construction…

The first in a series describing a system for internet remote control of a shortwave radio station. Its not something new. There are commercial products that provide remote operation of amateur radio transceivers. The purpose of this project is to make it possible to use shortwave radio sounds in musical performance, without the need of an antenna system.

Features:

  • Max/MSP for USB serial control of radio, OSC remote interface, user interface, Midi device handling, and an SQLITE database of preset frequencies.
  • Low latency, good quality audio using Soundjack by Alex Carot.
  • Hardware control of radio using Midi controllers (CDJ-101 and Launchpad)
  • Bi-directional OSC and VOIP using Logmein Hamachi VPN
  • Additional hardware control of AC power and antenna selection using Arduino and a WeMo switch.
  • TouchOSC Ipad audio mixer control using MOTU Cuemix
  • TeamViewer remote desktop software for logging into to base station compuer
  • Optional radio user interface control with Ipod TouchOSC, Griffin Powermate dial, and Korg Nano-kontrol.
  • Optional VOIP backup using Mumble.

System diagram

base station:

remote-radio-sys1

remote control:

remote-radio-sys2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Internet shortwave radio using Max, Hamachi, and Mumble

How to control an amateur radio transceiver over the internet, using Osc (Open Sound Control), VOIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) and VPN (Virtual Private Networks).

What problem does this solve?

Using a shortwave radio receiver in a  live performance without installing a large antenna system.

This method gives low-latency real-time access to audio, and radio control using a laptop computer from anywhere. I suppose it could also remote-control a synthesizer, if you’re into that kind of thing.

CAT

Modern ham radio receivers can be controlled using serial commands using the CAT (Computer Aided Transceiver) protocol. Usually this is done via a USB port. There are hardware solutions for remote controlling radios over the internet, like RemoteRig http://www.remoterig.com/wp/. But there is also a free, or low cost, solution using software.

System diagram

Screen Shot 2015-12-21 at 1.23.10 AM

The ‘base’ computer is connected to the radio/antenna. The ‘remote’ computer is a laptop that could be anywhere connected by WiFi

For this experiment we used a TenTec Eagle transceiver connected to a MacBook USB port. The audio output of the radio connects to the audio input of the MacBook. The MacBook is directly connected to an internet WiFi router using an ethernet cable.

VOIP

A mumble client runs on the base computer, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mumble_(software)  and also on the remote laptop. Both clients are connected to a Mumble server (Murmur) at Mumble.com http://www.mumble.com/mumble-download.php. You could also run your own server. I set the audio to the best quality and muted the microphone on the remote laptop. We are only using the laptop as a receiver. For transmitting, you could simply open up another channel on the Murmur server. Mumble has very low latency (compared to Skype) and decent audio quality.

Bi-directional commands using VPN and OSC

CAT commands go in both directions – to and from the radio. For example, you would send a command to the radio to change frequency. The radio would send acknowledgements back to the remote laptop.

This is a problem for networks that use NAT (Network Address Translation) because local IP addresses are private, hidden behind routers. The solution that eventually worked was using a VPN called Hamachi https://secure.logmein.com/products/hamachi/download.aspx on both the remote and base computers. Hamachi servers are setup on both computers and connected to each other. This allows the computers to ‘see’ each other as if they were on a local network.

Max and Osc

Max patches are run on both the base and remote computers. The Max patch on the base computer connects to the radio using the serial object and passes commands back and forth over the internet using udpsend and udpreceive (which use Osc).

The Max patch on the remote MacBook sends and receives commands from the base computer using updsend and udpreceive. With the Hamachi VPN, Osc works just like it does on a LAN (local area network).

Automatic reconfiguration of clients

The main advantage of this system is that when you move the remote MacBook to a new location – for example, a coffee shop with public Wifi – both the Mumble and Hamachi clients automatically reconfigure for the location. So you don’t need to know the actual IP address of your computer in the coffee shop. The reconfiguration usually happens within seconds after the Wifi connection is made.

Alternatives

If you are just working across a LAN, you don’t need a VPN. Osc will run on a local network using private IP’s.

You could also try Ross Bencina’s Oscgroups http://www.rossbencina.com/code/oscgroups. Although I was not able to get Oscgroups to work, other than in a LAN.

For uni-directional Osc communication from remote to base, in a WAN (wide area network) you can use a static IP address for the target.

Skype is another (free) solution for transmitting VOIP audio. Set the base computer in auto-answer mode and call it from the remote computer. Skype will process the audio more than mumble, with noise gates and such. And the latency is higher. But its very easy to set up.

Development

The next step is to build a remote interface for the radio that uses Midi/Osc controllers, so for example you can turn a dial on the Midi controller to change frequency or filter settings on a base radio.

to be continued…

Convert photocell data to MIDI

With Arduino and Max.

Screen Shot 2015-04-26 at 7.27.20 PM

An update to the basic Arduino/Max patches: https://reactivemusic.net/?p=11809

Replace the potentiometer in the “Arduino Serial Read” project with a photocell (LDR: Light dependent resistor)  and a 10K pulldown resistor, wired as shown in the image above and explained here: https://learn.adafruit.com/photocells/using-a-photocell (from Adadfruit)

The “Analog” lead represents the center terminal of a potentiometer and connects to A0.

The Arduino sketch is the example sketch: Analog | analogInOutSerial

download

Screen Shot 2015-04-26 at 7.50.42 PM

https://github.com/tkzic/max-projects

folder: arduino-basics

patch: arduino-serial-read-midi.maxpat

For instructions and circuit, refer to “Arduino Serial Read” project: https://reactivemusic.net/?p=11809

Jitter in javascript

Why would you write Jitter code inside a js object?

  • Math expressions
  • File IO
  • Borrowed code
  • You’re just that way

There are three Jitter javascript tutorials (built in to Max) 45-47

Screen Shot 2015-04-24 at 12.55.44 AM

The Max javascript documentation is generally far flung. A helpful reference by Tim Schenk https://reactivemusic.net/?p=17445

Here’s an example to get started with. It downsamples a movie and changes the background color. Something I often dream about.

Screen Shot 2015-04-24 at 12.35.31 AM

Download

https://github.com/tkzic/max-projects

Folder: jitter-js

  • patch: downsamp-thing.maxpat
  • javascript source: downsamp.js

Writing Jitter external objects

Not as easy as it looks.

Screen Shot 2015-04-24 at 12.48.55 AM

Getting started

First, think of a way to get the same results without writing an external. For example, borrow other code, use javascript, gen, Processing, or MSPaint.

Apparently that didn’t work out. Well I can only get you so far.

Assuming that you have already done the following

Learn how to write non-Jitter externals:

Edit the examples

Currently the Jitter examples in the SDK are in the folders: examples/matrix and examples/gl. We’ll pretend we didn’t see GL.

Here’s a sensible approach on Mac OS.

  • Duplicate the example folder: jit.clip and rename the duplicate to something like jit.cliptz
  • Inside jit.cliptz open the Xcode project
  • Rename the Xcode project while in Xcode by single-clicking on the project name and editing it.
  • Now feel free to alter the code in any way. Look in jit.clip.c

In jit.clip.c, find the functions starting with

void jit_clip_vector_char(long n, t_jit_clip_vecdata *vecdata, t_jit_op_info *in, t_jit_op_info *out)

These are functions that processing the matrix vectors for char, long, and float matrixes respectively. We’ll work with the char function.

Change the code so that the pixel values are inverted as well as clipped by subtracting pixel values from 255.

Change two lines of code, marked here by the comment: // invert

	if ((is==1)&&(os==1)) {
		++n;--op;--ip;
		while (--n) {
			tmp =  *++ip;
			*++op = 255 - tmp>max?max:tmp<min?min:tmp; // invert
		}		
	} else {
		while (n--) {
			tmp =  *ip;
			*op = 255 - tmp>max?max:tmp<min?min:tmp; // invert
			ip+=is;op+=os;
		}
	}

 

  •  Clean and build the project.
  • The .mxo file will be under the Products folder. <Ctrl> click to show in finder
  • Copy the .mxo file into the same folder as your Max patch
  • What Max patch? This one:

Screen Shot 2015-04-24 at 12.38.14 AM

The window on the left is inverted because its getting that way in the object we just hacked.

That’s all

I didn’t really explain anything. Sometimes going through the motions is a start. If I had to do this for a living I would find the example that is most like a desired result and hack away.

Download

https://github.com/tkzic/max-projects

folder: jitter-dev

files:

  • test-object.maxpat
  • jit.cliptz.mxo (external) you will make your own version of this in Xcode

 

Jitter gen

Tutorials by Gregory Taylor

gen~ for beginners (not Jitter) https://cycling74.com/wiki/index.php?title=gen~_For_Beginners

Delicious Max Tutorials by dude837 

http://otherbirds.com/tutorials/

Pixelface (gen): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e49qgv5NuUQ