Hamlib and rigctl

Hamlib provides a linux command-line API for amateur radios.

Hamlib_design

Installation

On Mac OS you can install using Mac Ports:

sudo port install hamlib

Usage

Get a list of “rig numbers” for supported radios:

rigctl -l

Find available serial ports:

ls /dev/tty.*

Set the frequency to 7.2 MHz and mode to LSB on a Tentec Eagle transceiver:

rigctl -m 1608 -r /dev/tty.usbmodem14531 -s 57600 F 7200000 M LSB 0

Use a rigctl command with no commands at the end to start an interactive command shell.

Network control with TCP/IP

First start the daemon. It uses port 4532 by default, but here we are setting it explicitly:

rigctld -m 1608 -r /dev/tty.usbmodem14531 -s 57600 -t 4532 &

Then in another window, send commands to the daemon using netcat. For set example, to set the frequency to 14.247:

echo “\set_freq 14247000” | nc -w 1 localhost 4532

Max/MSP

This patch uses the mxj tcpClient object from https://cycling74.com/toolbox/tcpclient/#.Vnj_fpMrKuU by Arvid Tomayko to communicate with rigctld over TCP/IP. The patch below is a modified help file that connected to the radio using rigctld as configured above.

Screen Shot 2015-12-22 at 2.47.10 AM

Notes on grig and rpc.rigd

grig is a graphical rig front end for hamlib by Alex Csete. rpc.rigd is a daemon that allows multiple clients. I was able to get both of them sort of working together (use -m 1901 from grig) but the daemon starts streaming error messages “read_string timeout without reading a character”. Also the latency with grig over the LAN is high. Its possible that there are problems with the rig CAT file. I am using the file for the Tentec Orion – as I haven’t figured out how to add new devices. At any rate, the above methods (UDP or TCP command line) are way more responsive.

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